Actus Monde

Cyclists are not the bad guys

Financial Times : A revolution requires a few barricades and our cities need more bikes and fewer cars

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https://www.ft.com/content/2eb872a9-8afd-4896-bf36-ed7227c0818a

Apple founder Steve Jobs once want­ed to call the Mac­in­tosh com­put­er “the Bicy­cle”. He was that amazed by the two-wheel­ers’ effi­cien­cy. He was right: bikes are incred­i­ble machines. You can cycle five miles expend­ing as much ener­gy as it would take you to walk one. Bikes don’t pol­lute our air. They don’t clog our roads. If our cities had more bikes, they would be clean­er and safer. We would be fit­ter. Our neigh­bour­hoods would be more socia­ble, because you can stop for a chat on a bike in a way that you rarely can in a car. Yet some­how we have con­vinced our­selves that cyclists are the ene­my. “The moral supe­ri­or­i­ty of cyclists has to stop,” read one UK head­line this week. “I can’t keep abreast of what cyclists want,” ran anoth­er. Years of sim­i­lar cov­er­age have con­tributed to a gen­er­al con­tempt.

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Thierry Roch

Président de l'au5v, Association des Usagers du Vélo, des Voies Vertes et Véloroutes des Vallées de l'Oise.

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